Buddhist Travel
Traveler Tales

Travel Stories

Inside the Kumbum monastery

BY MICHAEL A. LEV, Chicago Tribune, December 9, 2004

HUANGZHONG, China -- A monk is talking on his cell phone. A monk is driving his car. A monk is playing violent video games at an Internet cafe. A monk is discussing Chinese politics, describing the heartache of living under communist domination.

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The Potala Palace -- a treasure house in Lhasa

China View, Dec 6, 2004

Lhasa, Tibet (China) -- Little remains of the original Potala Palace of the seventh century, built as a place for meditation by King Songtsen Gampo on the occasion of his marriage to Princess Wencheng of the Tang Court. Standing atop the Red Hill in Lhasa, the current structure dates from the 17th century; it was rebuilt by the 5th Dalai Lama and became the Winter Palace of the Dalai Lamas from that time. The 13-story building of 1,000 rooms can be seen from many miles away.

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Laid back in surprising Laos

By William Foreman, IOL, December 5, 2004

Vientiane, Laos -- A slow, thumping drum beat summoned about 15 Buddhist monks wrapped in orange robes as the sun began to rise, and they gathered at a massive gold stupa called Pha That Luang - the most important national symbol in Laos.

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Impressions of Tibetan life in U-Tsang

China Tibet Information Center, Dec 3, 2004

Beijing, China -- TIBETAN-INHABITED areas in China are divided into the U-Tsang, Amdo and Kamba regions. U-Tsang refers to the Tibet Autonomous Region itself, Amdo to the southern Gansu and Qinghai provinces and Kamba to more remote areas such as Garze Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Sichuan Province, Deqen Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Yunnan Province, Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture and Golog Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai Province.

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Temple brillance

China Daily, Dec 3, 2004

Beijing, China -- The mountains in west suburban Beijing usually lure many visitors thanks to their cooling resorts in summer and golden scenery in autumn. But they are not the favourite in winter except those who like a quite surrounding in a Buddhist temple, Buddhist architecture, culture and the special winter scenery hidden within mountains saturated in pine trees.

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Finding Buddhist serenity in Bangkok's markets

By Karen Emmons International Herald Tribune, December 27, 2004

BANGKOK, Thailand -- At every turn in this ancient citadel of Buddhist culture, a visitor is struck by the contrast of non-material ascetism and material delight. This is especially the case when White Christmas arrives through the airwaves of tropical Bangkok's department stores in November and images of frosty snowmen and Santas appear in the humid shadows of the city's Buddhist temples.

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Temple stay at traditional Buddhist sites

The Korea Herald, Nov 30, 2004

Seoul, South Korea -- Does life leave you feeling rushed and stressed' Gangwon-do invites you to an incredible place that will take your breath away, a place that boasts a stunning landscape filled with greenery and natural life. Amid the relaxing scenery, take part in a "temple stay" and seize the opportunity to learn and experience Korean traditional culture by observing the daily life of a monk.

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A day in Vientiane is full of temples, colonial architecture and surprises?

The China Post (AP), Nov 26, 2004

VIENTIANE, Laos -- A slow, thumping drum beat summoned about 15 Buddhist monks wrapped in orange robes as the sun began to rise, and they gathered at a massive gold stupa called Pha That Luang - the most important national symbol in Laos.

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The myriad sights of Songshan

by Celeste Fong, The Star, Nov 19, 2004

One of the cradles of human civilisation, the Songshan mountainous region boasts breathtaking scenery, philosophy, faith and Shaolin wushu martial artists, writes CELESTE FONG.

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Silluk-sa: Korea's Only Riverside Temple

By Jeffrey Miller, The Korea Times Feature Writer, Nov 17, 2004

YEOJU, Kyonggi Province (South Korea) -- At almost any Buddhist temple in Korea, you'll have to do some climbing. That's because most of Korea's more famous temples are located in the mountains or at the foothills. While these temples are great for some healthy exploration of the body and soul, there's at least one famous in temple in Korea that doesn't require a healthy set of lungs and strong legs to reach.

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